Leschi-Governor Stevens Comparison Lessons 
 
This series of lessons focuses on two of the main characters in the Puget Sound Indian Wars-Governor Isaac Stevens and Leschi. In many ways these two men represent their two culture very well and they work perfectly as lenses into the conflict. These lessons look at each of them individually and then also together, in comparison. These lessons use two different biographies as their main sources of information. The biography on Leschi is written by Patricia Pierce Erickson, with the Washington State History Museum. The biography of Stevens is written by the Washington State Historical Society.
 
To go directly to the article on Leschi, click here
To go directly to the article on Stevens, click here
 
 
Option #1 (Leschi Biography) 
 This option is designed to give students a sense of who Leschi was and the circumstances of his life. The lesson is very flexible. This can easily be used in conjunction with the next couple of options
 
GLEs
History 4.2.1- Understands how individuals or movements have helped to shape Washington State
History 4.1.2.2- Understands how the theme of treaty making has shaped Washington State
 
Steps
(All of these steps can be adapted to fit the needs of students in your class. Obviously, the lower the reader the more involvement from the teacher the better)
1. Depending on how you want to use this lesson students will read the article on Leschi either alone, in small groups or as a whole class. To access the article click here.
2. Again, depending on how the lesson is being used students will answer the guided reading questions either alone, in small groups or as a whole class. If done alone or in small groups, it is recommended that the teacher ultimately brings the class back together to discuss the answers and push towards any extensions that may be ahead (such as options #2-4). To access the guided reading questions worksheet, click here.
 
Option #2 (Stevens Biography) 
This option is designed to give students background into the life of Isaac Stevens, the first territorial governor of Washington. This would work great with option #1 but it could also be a stand alone lesson within a U.S. history class to give some local perspective on issues such as the Mexican and Civil Wars.
  
GLEs
History 4.2.1- Understands how individuals or movements have helped to shape Washington State
History 4.1.2.2- Understands how the theme of treaty making has shaped Washington State
 
Steps
(All of these steps can be adapted to fit the needs of students in your class. Obviously, the lower the reader the more involvement from the teacher the better)
1. Depending on how you want to use this lesson students will read the article on Stevens either alone, in small groups or as a whole class. To access the article click here.
 2. Again, depending on how the lesson is being used students will answer the guided reading questions either alone, in small groups or as a whole class. If done alone or in small groups, it is recommended that the teacher ultimately brings the class back together to discuss the answers and push towards any extensions that may be ahead (such as options #1-4, or any of the other lessons). To access the guided reading questions worksheet, click here.
 
Option #3 (Stevens-Leschi Comparison)
This option asks students to look at these two figures and compare them each to each other. This is an easy extension of the first two options.
 
GLEs
History 4.2.1- Understands how individuals or movements have helped to shape Washington State
History 4.1.2.2- Understands how the theme of treaty making has shaped Washington State
 
Steps
1. Students, either alone, in small groups or as a whole class, should read the articles on Isaac Stevens ( To access, click here) and of Leschi (to access, click here). It is also recommended that students answer the review questions about each of the article (For Leschi, click here. For Stevens, click here). It is possible to skip the step of having students answering the review questions but it is suggested that the teacher reviews the questions to have a shorter whole class discussion to prepare students for the next step.
2. Students, working either alone or in pairs, complete the Leschi-Stevens Comparison Venn diagram. They are filling in one side with details of Leschi's life and the other with details of Stevens' life. The middle section is dedicated to things that are similar, or the same, about the two men's lives. To access the Venn diagram, click here
3. Coming together as a whole class, the teacher takes suggestions to complete a class version of the Venn diagram. Interesting discussion points should be about which items are in common between the two men and why the things that are different are that way. This lesson could easily be combined with the next option.
 
Option #4 (Stevens-Leschi Comparison with foldable)
This option is the same as the previous option except that it adds and artistic aspect to the presentation of information. 
 
Steps
1. Follow step 1 from the previous lesson.
2. After students have completed the readings and questions of the two men, they will be creating a Venn diagram comparing the two. If students need extra support it might be helpful to have them complete the Venn diagram with this worksheet (here). If students are comfortable with the idea of a Venn diagram they can move onto the next step.
3. Students will be presenting their comparisons visually. To do this students will need a small piece of construction paper. First they will it in half width wise (Hot dog style for those that know what that means). The next step it fold each half in half again so that the students have a paper divided in four sections. They then fold the outer sections back in so that the paper looks like a book that opens both ways (There are examples ahead). The outer cover students will need to create a cover that shows what the viewer is going to see inside. Inside the students create a Venn diagram comparing the two men. An additional step it to create a timeline on the bottom that has key events from each man's life side by side. This could be graded with a rubric or simply checking off that each part is done.
4. A nice closure activity would be for each student to present their foldable or have some kind of display set- up for everyone to go around and view each others. 
 
Examples:
 
 
#1 Close-up of Inside 
#2 Close-up of Inside